Non-relative receiving calls for me asking for payment.

by Marion Basford
(Jarvisburg, NC, USA)

I had a voluntary repo on a motorhome. The motorhome sold at auction and there is a balance due. Wells Fargo only had my cell phone and home phone number. They call about once a month asking for payment and I keep telling them that I do not have the money.

Well now, they must have looked up to see if I had any other phone numbers in my name and came across another number. The phone bill is in my name, but it is for a telephone that an elder friend of the family has in a nursing home. They just needed a billing name and address for the bill since she has no living relatives.
Now Wells Fargo is calling her, in the nursing home, and asking if she is my wife and if I am ever there. She has told them I do not live there and that they are calling an institute, but still call every other week. The calls confuse her and get her upset.

How can I get them to stop calling her?

Comments for Non-relative receiving calls for me asking for payment.

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Dec 18, 2012
Non-relative receiving calls for me asking for payment.
by: Debtcollectionanswers.com

I recommend you write a letter on your relative's behalf and have her sign the letter. The letter should state that she does not owe the debt Wells Fargo is calling her about and that she wants all communication about the debt to cease immediately. Be sure to reference the account # associated with the debt so that the bank knows exactly what debt the letter is about. Make a copy of the letter for your files and send the letter certified mail with a return receipt requested.

If you want to resolve the debt that you owe to Wells Fargo and minimize additional damage to your credit history and FICO score, you may want to consider working out a payment plan with the bank that would allow you to pay what you owe over time. If you do, do not pay anything on the plan until you have all of its terms in writing.

Another option is to try to settle the debt. When you settle a debt, you resolve it by paying less than the full amount owed. Again, this is something you would have to negotiate with Wells Fargo and you should not pay the settlement amount until you have all of the terms of your agreement in writing.

If you ignore the debt, not only will your credit history and FICO score take a hit, but Wells Fargo may sue you for the money you owe, depending on the amount that you owe.

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