Debt collector wants money FASTER!

by Shalina
(Salem, Oregon)

I was took to court for owing the state of Washington 3000.
The courts added court costs and said that I am to pay 50 a month. I have been paying my payment every month. Today I got a letter in the mail from a "recovery" collector for the department of human services in I call and talk to the man who answers the phone I tell him I have court payments for this account he asks me how much I am paying I tell him 50 he tells me that's not enough and I will never get it payed off. I tell him I do not have and income besides financial aid from school he says how do u pay your rent? I say I don't think that's none of your business like I said F.A he says humm they give felons help with school? That's interesting. How do you pay for rent? I say housing (section 8) he makes some derogatory statements about that to. At that point I get irritated and tell him that I got this fine because I sent my kids to Oregon to visit their grandma and did not know it was against the law if you get help from the state. He says that they will garnish my wages and seize my bank accounts if I do not comply with them. I again tell him I pay my payment I was court ordered. He says they have the right to get the money from me if they feel the courts are not getting enough fast enough is this true?

Comments for Debt collector wants money FASTER!

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Dec 23, 2010
Collector Wants More Money Than Court Ordered
by: Mary

Thanks for sharing your collection story with us.

If you are living up to the terms of the court order, and it sounds like you are, then you are meeting your legal obligation to the State of Washington. Therefore, there is no reason why you should pay more than the $50/month that you indicate you are required to pay.

If you hear from the collector again, do not engage in any conversation with him other than to politely tell him that you are not going to answer his questions. You are not legally obligated to share any information about yourself or your finances with the collector. I am concerned that if you continue to talk with him when he calls, you may say something that will complicate your situation, especially since it sounds like he is trying to make you angry so that you will let your guard down.

You should also know that his threats to garnish your wages are empty because as you indicated in your question, you have no wages.

In light of the collector's demands, comments and threats, I strongly recommend that you get in touch with a consumer law attorney in your area who handles debt collection cases (Your first appointment should be free.) Find out how to get FREE or low cost legal advice about debt collection from a consumer law attorney here. You may have the basis for legal action against the collector.

At the very least, the attorney you speak with can advise you about your best next steps. For example, the attorney may advise you to tell the debt collector to please not contact you again, something you are legally entitled to do. Be sure to follow up your verbal request with a letter stating the same thing. Send the letter certified mail with a return receipt so that you have proof that it was received. Once you tell a debt collector not to contact you again, the law says that he must cease all contact other than to confirm that he will not get in touch again or to notify you of any legal action he may be about to pursue. However, I would not take this step without speaking to an attorney first.

Please share what happens with your situation in the comments section for this question. We are very interested in hearing how this turns out for you, and your experience can help others who are struggling with debt collectors.

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