Debt collector call me at work?

by edngo
(union city, ca)

Can a debt collector can call me at work to ask for a debt that i don't even know?

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Jun 06, 2013
Debt collector call me at work?
by: Debtcollectionanswers

A debt collector can contact you at work about a debt. However, if your employer does not want you being contacted on the job and you make the collector aware of that fact, the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act says that the collector cannot contact you again.

Now if you are not sure that you owe the debt the collector wants you to pay, ask him to provide you with proof that you do. It's best to put your request in writing and to send your letter to the collector via certified mail with a return receipt requested. (Make a copy of the letter for your files first.) If you make this request by phone, follow it up in writing.

If you have other questions about your debt collection rights, we recommend that you
get our ebook Debt Collection Answers. The book's information will help you protect your rights when you are dealing with a debt collector and will help you figure out what to do when a collector gets in touch.

Jun 05, 2014
debt collector at work
by: Anonymous

A collector called my work and instead of asking for information from hr dept ask to speak to me or my supervisor. My supervisor was annoyed and and would nothing of my financial obligations. Is that legal?

Reply from DebtcollectionAnswers.com

A debt collector cannot call you at work if you tell them not to call you there. A collector cannot discuss your debt with your colleagues, boss etc. Are you sure this is a legitimate debt collector and not a scammer? If it is a legit third party collection agency we'd recommend you get a free consultation with a consumer law attorney. Another option would be to file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.


Oct 12, 2014
Debt
by: Anonymous

Question "Do you think the party that funded the loan should be the party repaid the loan?"

Here is where the money comes from in the banks own words.

MODERN MONEY MECHANICS
This complete booklet is was originally produced and distributed free by:
Public Information Center
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

"Of course, they do not really pay out loans from the money they
receive as deposits. If they did this, no additional money would be created. What they do when they make loans is to accept promissory notes in exchange for credits to the
borrowers’ transaction accounts. Loans (assets) and deposits (liabilities) both
rise"

"Two Faces of Debt" by Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago Sept. 1992

"Such newly created funds are in addition to funds that all financial institutions provide in their operations as intermediaries between savers and users of savers"

"I Bet You Thought" Federal Reserve bank of New York Dec. 1977

Commercial banks create checkbook money whenever they grant a loan. Simply by adding new deposit dollars to account on their books in exchange for a borrower's IOU.

So just remember when the banks takes your home "the banks does not have a dime in the loan" but yet they get your house for FREE!!!

Feb 16, 2015
bankruptcy
by: Anonymous

My name on my house deed has been removed the house was purchased with my daughter and son in law 20 yrs ago the pay for the mortgage and bills. I removed my name because I am in financial debt and would like to file bankruptcy how long do I have to wait to file now that my name is not on the deed? Appreciate an answer.Thank you.

Reply from DebtCollectionAnswers.com

Please talk with a bankruptcy attorney. It is not a good idea to transfer property when you are contemplating bankruptcy and you may have complicated things for yourself. But only the attorney can advise you specifically on how to proceed. The first consultation should be free, so don't be afraid to get help. If you need help finding one you can call the Debt Collection hotline toll free at 888-747-6242.

Mar 06, 2015
Debt 13 years old
by: Anonymous

Can a collector try to collect a debt over 13 years old?

Reply from DebtCollectionAnswers.com

It depends. In most states the statute of limitations for consumer debts is around 4-6 years. After that time, they can usually try to collect but you can also tell them to leave you alone. We suggest you read what we wrote about sending cease and desist letter to stop a debt collector.

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Calls at Work From Debt

by Cathy
(Raleigh, NC USA)

My husband's business that went under owes several credit cards and they are now calling me at work asking for a phone number for him.

I told them never to contact me again.

What are my rights?

Thank you

Cathy

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Feb 16, 2011
Collection calls at work for business debt
by: DebtCollectionAnswers.com

Cathy,

Under the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, debt collectors must stop calling you at work if you ask them to do so. The problem is, however, that law does not apply to business debts. If these are business credit cards and not personal credit cards, then you don't have the protection of the FDCPA here, though there may be state laws that apply.

If the calls continue, it would not hurt for you to talk with a consumer law attorney to find out whether at the debt collectors are breaking other laws by continuing to call you at work over your husband's business debt.

You can talk with a consumer law attorney with experience in debt collection cases. Learn how to get low cost or FREE legal help with your debt collection problem here.

If your husband's business debts are large and he is unable to pay them, we would encourage you to get him to set up a a free consultation with a bankruptcy attorney to find out whether he needs to consider that option. Even if he doesn't want to file, it might be a good idea for both of you to talk with an attorney so you can find out what your options are if he is sued for these debts.


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Harassing Phone Calls at Work

are cllection agencies allowed to call you and harrass you at work 5 or 6 times a day.

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Dec 23, 2010
Harassing Phone Calls at Work
by: Mary

Thanks for sharing your collection story with us.

The federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) gives you specific rights when you are contacted by a debt collector. They include the right to tell a collector not to contact you at work if your employer does not want collectors calling you there. If you tell a collector not to call you at work anymore, follow up the conversation by sending the collector a letter instructing him to cease calling you at your place of employment.

If a collector continues calling you at work after you've told him not to, the collector is breaking the law and you should get in touch right away with a consumer law attorney in your area who handles debt collection cases. Find out how to get FREE or low cost legal advice about debt collection from a consumer law attorney here. You may have grounds for legal action against the collector.

Send your letter certified mail with a return receipt requested. The receipt provides proof that your letter was received. Also, make a copy of your letter before you mail it and file the copy for safekeeping in case you need it later.

The FDCPA also gives you the right not to be harassed by debt collectors. Harassment includes being called repeatedly during the same day about money that you owe. Given the frequency of the collector's calls to you, he is probably breaking the law. Again, this is something you should discuss with a consumer law attorney.

It's important to begin keeping a written record of your interactions with the debt collector. This information will be helpful if you decide to work with an attorney. An easy way to do that is to use my Free Debt Collection Worksheet. Keep a copy by your phone at home and at work so you can record when the collector calls you, what the collector says, and so on.

Good luck resolving your debt collection problems!

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Can a debt collector contact me at or come to my work?

by Jamie F
(Chatt Tn)

I have a loan, and haven't been able to make the payments for over a month. These people have called my work place, now they have came to my work also.

Is this legal and what can I do?

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Jun 07, 2011
Can a debt collector contact me at or come to my work?
by: DebtCollection Answers.com

The federal Fair Debt Collection Protection Act (FDCPA) allows a debt collector to contact you at work unless the collector knows that your employer does not want you to be contacted there. Therefore, if your employer does not want you to receive calls from collectors on the job, let the collector know. You can share that information with the collector over the phone but you should follow up by putting the same information in a letter. Make a copy of the letter for your files and mail the original letter to the collector via certified mail with a return receipt requested.

The FDCPA does not specifically prohibit a collector from coming to your workplace. Again however, if you make it clear to the collector that your employer does not want you contacted on the job, then the collector cannot come to your workplace again. Also, you should know that if the collector tells your employer or one of your co-workers why he wants to talk with you the collector has violated the FDCPA.

If the collector continues contacting you at your job once you've told him not to, you may want to get in touch with a consumer law attorney who helps consumers resolve their debt collection problems. Find out how to get FREE or low cost legal advice about debt collection from a consumer law attorney here.

One other piece of advice, I recommend that you go here to download a copy of our
Free Debt Collection Worksheet. Keep the form next to your phone at work and fill it out each time the collector contacts you at your place of employment by phone or in person after you have told him not to. Your worksheet information could be very helpful if you decide to take legal action against the collector.


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Can a Collector Contact You at Work

by Carol
(Missouri)

Can NCO or any collection agency contact you at work and continue to harass you after you tell them that you are at work. And then continue to call your home phone and cell phone when you just told them you are at work?? Are they able to ask how much you make an hour

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Dec 22, 2010
Can a Collector Contact a Consumer at Work
by: Mary

Thanks for getting in touch.

The federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) says that if you tell a collector that your employer does not want you contacted at work and the collector continues to call you there, the collector has violated that law. It's always best to put any request you make to a debt collector in writing however so you have proof that you made the request. Therefore, if your employer doesn't want you contacted on the job, put that information in writing immediately, make a copy of your letter for your files and mail the letter to the debt collector. Send it certified mail with a return receipt requested.

It's possible that the phone calls to your cell and your home after you told the debt collector not to contact you at work would be considered harassment, which is also illegal under the FDCPA. I cannot say for sure because I don't know all of the circumstances related to those calls and because I am not an attorney. Therefore you may want to contact a consumer law attorney in your area who handles debt collection cases. Find out how to get FREE or low cost legal advice about debt collection from a consumer law attorney here. In light of the calls you've been getting at work and the subsequent calls to your cell and home phones, you have grounds for legal action against the collector.

As for whether the collector can ask you how much you earn per hour, the law does not prohibit him from asking you that question, but at the same time, you are not legally required to answer the question. In fact, you should not provide a debt collector with any information about your finances, your bank accounts, and so on.

Given all of the problems that you are having with the collector, I recommend that you get up to speed on your federal debt collection rights by purchasing a copy of the book I wrote with Gerri Detweiler, Debt Collection Answers: How to Use Debt Collection Laws to Protect Your Rights. You canread the first chapter of Debt Collection Answers online for free.

Please share what happens with your situation in the comments section for this question. We are very interested in hearing how this turns out for you, and your experience can help others who are struggling with debt collectors.


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calls at work

are they allowed to call you at your place of employment?

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Apr 23, 2010
Debt collector calls at work
by: Mary

Thanks for submitting your debt collection question on our Q&A page.

A debt collector may call you at work unless the debt collector knows or has reason to know that your employer does not want the debt collector to call you when you are on the job. So, write the debt collector a letter telling him that your employer does not want you to be contacted at work. Make a copy of the letter for your files and send the letter via certified mail, with a return receipt.

Once the debt collector receives your letter all of his calls at your work should cease. If they do not, then the debt collector has violated the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and you should either contact a consumer law attorney in your area with experience in debt collection cases. Find out how to get FREE or low cost legal advice about debt collection from a consumer law attorney here.

If the calls continue after you send your letter, I would also advise that you keep a record of the date of the calls and what the debt collector says to you using our Free Debt Collection Worksheet. The information on this sheet can help you build a strong case against the debt collector that would be helpful to your attorney if you decided to sue the collector for having violated your legal rights.

You should also read the first chapter of Debt Collection Answers online for freeso you have a general understanding of your debt collection rights.

Good luck resolving your problem.


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Workplace Harrassment

by Cathy
(Illinois)

I had a collection agency call me at work quite a few times. I didn't know the number, so I called it back after them calling about the 5th or 6th time.

This woman pressured me into agreeing to a certain amount down, although I can't afford it (my husband and son both lost their jobs) with monthly payments as well that I can't afford.

One thing that really bothered me was that she said to me, "Fine, if you won't work with me then transfer me to your Human Resources Department so we can get this thing rolling."

Is that against the law? Does she have the right to do anything with my paycheck? She wasn't the credit card company I owe money to, but a collection agency?

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Apr 14, 2010
debt collection calls at work
by: Gerri

Thanks for submitting your debt collection question on our Q&A page.

Unless the debt collector had the ability to garnish your wages (which usually requires taking you to court and getting a judgment first) she would not have any right to reveal your debt to your employer. It sounds as if she may have threatened you that she would do that unless you paid up. If so, that is likely illegal.

In addition, it is your right under federal law to tell a debt collector not to contact you again at work. Once you tell the debt collector that, collection calls at work must stop.

Cathy, I would encourage you to do two things.

1. Read our ebook Debt Collection Answers. It sounds like this debt collector may not be playing by the rules, and by reading it you may identify other potential illegal activities. At a minimum, please at least read the first chapter of Debt Collection Answers online for free so you have an overview of your rights.

2. Please contact a local consumer law attorney with experience in debt collection cases. Find out how to get FREE or low cost legal advice about debt collection from a consumer law attorney here. If the debt collector broke the law, you may be entitled to damages and attorneys fees.

Please do let us know how this turns out for you.

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serving papers at work

by laurie
(garland tx usa)

can you be served papers at work if you tell them your work wont allow it. This is from an old credit card debt

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Dec 24, 2011
serving papers at work
by: Debtcollectionanswers

Yes you can be served anywhere, even at work. Your employer does not have a legal right to interfere with service and telling whomever is attempting to serve you that your employer does not want you served on the job, won't prevent it from happening. If you know you are going to be served and want to save yourself from the embarrassment of being served at work, arrange for it to happen at your home or somewhere else less public than your workplace.

Mar 11, 2012
served at work
by: scott

can you be served at work even if they did not get a hold of you any other way and you did not know you had the debt?

Yes. You can be served anywhere, including at work.
And it does not matter if you were unaware of the debt or that they did not try to serve you at some other location first. If you have been served over a debt you do not think you owe, I recommend that you contact a consumer law attorney in your are who helps people resolve their debt collection problems. Another option is to go here to schedule a free consultation with a consumer law attorney.

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